Monday, March 12, 2012

Path from Ballard to Whitecliff Farm

I and a few other people would love to know who has destroid this path going down to whitecliff farm. It's a nightmare to ride down and even harder to walk down. They have widened the path and put large rocks as gravel down. Well done to who ever done this:(



Posted by David Furmage to swanageview at 12/3/12 5:08 PM

23 comments:

The Postman said...

Is this actually a bridle way? I thought it was just for pedestrians.

Anonymous said...

This is a Bridleway which splits at the top of Ballard Down going to (1) The Glebe (2) back to the Studland road via the Obelisk and (3) to Old Harry.

Anonymous said...

The bridleway starts at the farm. Routes 1 & 2 are then footpaths 3 is a bridleway. I have met horses nad cyclists on all three. And why not?

The Postman said...

Well, bridleways are for bikes and horses, and footpaths for pedestrians. Having been on the receiving end of mad bikers coming down the footpath near the cliff, protection is needed in some places for people on foot, and of course bikes erode the paths faster than pedestrians do. Nothing against bikes, as long as they stay on proper tracks and don't ruin life for everyone else.

Robin from Swanage said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Robin from Swanage said...

The path from Ballard Down to Whitecliff Farm is a bridleway so horses and bicycles can use it.As a walker I wish cyclists would ring their bells before they run into me. I expect the footpaths officer at Purbeck DC has put the gravel down. If it is causing problems I suggest you contact Purbeck DC. I have not used this path for several months. The Swanage Walking Group seems to like using the cliff top route or the route by Godlingston Manor to avoid the cyclists.

Anonymous said...

"Well, bridleways are for bikes and horses, and footpaths for pedestrians"
Actually bridleways are for bikes and horses, and pedestrians. Although it would be nice to have jaywalker free routes for bike descents.

Anonymous said...

OK I got it now you mean the path from Ballard Down to the Farm not from Ballard Estate (is it Hill Road) where you are caged in crossing the field.

Anonymous said...

so presumable National Trust?

Robin from Swanage said...

Is anonymous at 14/3/12 at 8:28am trying to redefine a bridleway as a route in which walkers do not belong? I think you will find that many walkers are also cyclists and will get out of the way if the cyclists sound their bell. It looks like the National Trust own Studland Hill so perhaps they are the culprits. (2nd attempt at proving I am not a robot)

Baggy said...

Do cyclists even fit bells now? Lost count of how many have zoomed up behind me.
If they haven't got a bell, any chance of a loud cough?

David Furmage said...

If going down a steep hill and your hands on the brakes it's would be hard to use a bell. Yep bells are still used though it's called a sissy bell or sissy siren. You fit them upside down on a singlespeed bike where your gear shifter would normally be. So when riding along on your singlespeed bike and you thumb goes for the shifter though the bell is there it let's you know you are a sissy.

Anyway I normally let walkers know I am coming by shouting " Cyclist coming through " works quite well and always thank them aswell:)

Anonymous said...

You could always dismount when going down a hill when there are likely to be walkers or cycle slowly. I am sick of these arrogant bikers who think everyone should leap out of their way. Why can't they give way to walkers? I wonder if bridle paths are covered by the same laws as ordinary roads and whether bikers are legally bound to exercise due care and consideration to other users. They also cause far more damage to paths than all the walkers and horse riders combined. A few years ago the heath near the Agglestone had appalling ruts cut by bikes.

David Furmage said...

Ok , I do not see how bikers cause more damage. Think about it bikers fly along a path where feet and horses feet dig into the ground. The only time is see bikes doing damage is when they put their brakes on. The biggest cause of erosion is not the above , but rain water. Also if you come to a big puddle in a path what do you do? You go through it , why? Well if you keep going round it you cause more eroding. So I always and know many cyclists who I ride with do the same thing , ride through the puddle. As for the paths around Agglestone these have been like that for years even before Mountain bikes came into fashion. Though riding in Wales , Scotland and Ireland certain pathways through heathlands have been North Shored. Which is a term used in biking it means raised wooden pathways that are covered also in chicken wire to give grip. This helps the land from further erosion , no widening the paths and chucking massive gravel down:) so then the pathways are more easier for everyone to use.

Anonymous said...

yes the Grand Canyon and the Thames Estary wern't caused by mountain bikers?

Seeview said...

David Furmage,
I'm afraid you're wrong that bikes don't cause more damage than walkers.Apart from the extra weight of the bike,the rider's weight is concentrated into a much smaller surface than when on foot, so it is bound to make a deeper impression,which is why instead of flattening the ground out tyres make ruts in it.As for riders riding through puddles - I'm sure some do, but you only have to walk down a slightly muddy bridleway to see that most bikes appear to avoid the puddles,which means that they erode the ground next to them quicker than someone on foot would.

I walk a fair bit and I find that cyclists are just like car drivers - some have respect for other people and some don't,but they are definitely not as saintly as some of them claim.

I have to say,though,that horses do far more damage,but like walking, they are a natural and ancient form of transport

A biker/walker said...

I think most of the erosion on this path is caused by rain run-off, causing a mini stream effect, and cows naturally herding up and down the hill during the long winter months. Also, here most bike erosion is probably caused riding up on the loose surface not rolling down (unless the rear wheel is locked). Finally we all need to be more courteous but that is a social problem and not particular to any individual group!

David Furmage said...

Thing we have to remember aswell there are lots more bikers now than back in the days of horses and carts;) and lots more people wether they are on bike want to get out into the country side. So inevitable wear and tear will take place.

Anonymous said...

Wa;kers do not cause narrow ruts, bikes do. When bikes make these water flows along them and deepens them. The pattern of foot erosion is different and there is plenty of it on parts of the coastal path. Lets be thankfull the four wheel drive fraternity have not come down from the ridgeway and reaked their particular brand of environmental vandalism around here.

Anonymous said...

Why not keep the bikers off these paths and bridleways? Erosion would be reduced, peace restored and safety improved for all.

Local Resident said...

16/3/12
Why not keep the walkers off these bridleways? Erosion would be reduced, peace restored and safety improved for all.

a biker/walker said...

The ruts have always been there, in the seventies I use to go up this path sitting on the tank of my fathers motorcycle (you could do that then). Not to mention the extensive use of the hill during the war years, none of which is visible now except a few concrete plinths where the massive radar masts were cited. There was also another path in the other direction which is now completely invisible.

Alan Jefferis said...

I understand it was the Rights of Way department of Dorset County Council who did the work. I have left them my own comment at what a bad state they have left the path in.